LaserLyte Kryponite .50 BMG K-50

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posted on March 7, 2011
laserlyte.jpg

Add trigger time once you've gotten it dialed in, and it's little wonder we often feel like we're struggling to breath once we hit our sporting goods store's checkout counter.

If you shoot a .50 BMG, the strain on a pocketbook can be particularly challenging. Hornady's 750-grain A-Max load for .50 BMG, for example, runs about $76 for a ten-pack of cartridges. If you wonder why $7.60 per shot, you've probably never compared this massive ammunition to more familiar cartridges.

While LaserLyte can't lower the cost of ammo, its Kryptonite .50 BMG K-50 laser bore sighter will help you get that long-distance .50 BMG on paper without sacrificing as many cartridges. Operation is pretty straightforward. Insert into the chamber and close the bolt. Upon closing, a raised, pressure-activated switch on the back of the K-50 will be depressed and a green laser will be transmitted through your barrel and down range. It's important not to pull the trigger when the unit is inserted. Those .50 BMG primers are plenty hard, so a firing pin designed to ignite the big cartridge probably will damage that switch if you pull the trigger.

The K-50 runs on a single CR-2 battery. According to the company it will power the laser for up to 1.5 hours of continuous use. Replacement is pretty straightforward, simply unscrew the "case" head and insert a new battery. Made out of brass, it's a substantial unit I think will stand up to years of range bag abuse.

The instructions recommend using the laser at 30 yards to get the rifle on paper, but I found the light was visible at much further distances, particularly on overcast days. With cloud cover at 50 yards it was extremely visible on light-colored surfaces, and as just before the sun faded, the green dot was easily identifiable at 100 yards even without magnified optics—which makes those early morning range sessions when dialing in that gun even more attractive.

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