CrossBreed Holsters Introduces the Instructor Belt

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posted on December 6, 2011
instructor-belt.jpg

The new Instructor Belt from CrossBreed Holsters offers a clean, buckleless design intended for comfort and a sharp, professional appearance. Sturdy, but not too stiff, the Instructor Belt provides you with even weight-distribution of your gear, ensuring stability and comfort. Add the basket weave option, and the belt will look just as good out on the town as it does on the range.

All CrossBreed belts are made from two layers of top grain cowhide. These two leathers are then stitched together, cross grain from each other, using recessed stitching to provide protection to the stitches from surface abrasions. The finished belt is 1.5 inches wide and just under .25-inch thick.

The result is a thick, strong belt offering superior support for the gun and holster while being supple and flexible for comfortable wear. Instructor belts are also available with the Velcro-Kit, which includes a strip of loop Velcro stitched to the back of the belt and a pair of V-Clips and hardware for use with CrossBreed's SuperTuck holster. This combo results in total concealment and very good stability.

CrossBreed belts come with the company's two-week try-it-free guarantee and a lifetime warranty. MSRP for the Instructor Belt starts at $64.50.

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