Geissele Automatics Super Sabra

by
posted on October 2, 2014
geisseletrig.jpg

I love the IWI US Tavor SAR. After reviewing it in 2013, I immediately bought my test sample. Since then, I have continued to enjoy shooting it and I rely on it as my primary home-defense carbine.

It is an awesome gun, but it is not perfect. As I said in my review: "The trigger, while nowhere near what one would want on a long-range, precision rifle, was much better than expected. Bullpups are notorious for horrific triggers owing to the long trigger linkage required to activate a firing pin located far behind the bang switch. … I found Tavor's pull to be heavy, but smoother than anticipated."

The 11-pound trigger pull on the factory trigger was superior to most bullpups, but let's face it: 11 pounds is awfully heavy. Now, however, my Tavor has a smooth, 5.5-pound trigger pull thanks to Geissele Automatics' Super Sabra drop-in replacement.

Unlike Geissele's legendary AR trigger units, the Super Sabra is not actually a trigger. Rather, it replaces the sear assembly, which is located above the Tavor's bolt-release lever. The actual bang switch remains the factory unit, but the two-stage Super Sabra sear assembly reduces the pull weight by at least 50 percent and significantly shortens reset, too. The first stage is user-adjustable down to 3.5 pounds if you seek an even lighter trigger for precision work.

Installation could not be easier. The factory sear assembly is held in by two captive pins. Punch those out, rotate the bolt-release lever out of the way and the one-piece assembly will literally fall out of the gun. Insert the Super Sabra, push the rear pin back through, close the bolt-release lever—ensuring the holes are properly aligned—and push the forward pin in. That's it. If you want to go super slow, it will take five minutes.

The new pull feels much the same as the old at first, as some of the smooth take-up remains. I think this is because of the long trigger bar required to transfer the force from the forward-mounted trigger to the sear assembly at the rear of the carbine. Once you travel the take-up distance, however, the pull becomes crisper, lighter and overall markedly superior to the factory unit. If the weight reduction number and the fact it is a Geissele-designed and built product don't convince you, trying a Tavor with a Super Sabra installed will.

Five minutes to halve the trigger pull weight, increase the Tavor's already awesome ease-of-use and fix the carbine's only weakness? That's well worth the $350 price tag for the precisely machined aluminum Super Sabra.

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