David Tubb's AR-15 Flatwire Magazine Spring

by
posted on November 17, 2015
tubb-flat-spring.jpg

When it comes to magazine maintenance, there are two primary schools of thought. One is that magazines are a fungible commodity, and should be replaced when they start showing signs of wear. The second school of thought hates to let go of a good piece of kit, especially when replacement springs are nearly an order of magnitude cheaper than a new magazine.

David Tubb's AR-15 Flatwire Magazine Spring offers full 30-round capacity function with positive pre-load against the follower. While these are pricier than bulk replacement springs, the 17-7 stainless construction is designed to offer superior wear, and passes the U.S. Military's 96-hour saltwater bath test. 

The company claims that not only will the flatwire spring allow full loading of 30 rounds in magazines so designed, but in most magazines the spring will allow loading beyond 30 rounds. The flat nature of the spring allows it to lay flatter in the magazine body, offering up to 32 rounds in a standard magazine.

MSRP: $13.95.

Latest

BallistiClean 00 Buck
BallistiClean 00 Buck

BallistiClean 00 Buck Review

There’s less training conducted with the defensive shotgun than with any other defensive firearm. This is partly because shotguns recoil the hardest, and recoil is not something shooters typically enjoy. It’s also partly because shotguns—at least compared with handguns and carbines—are a bit expensive to shoot, especially if you’re training with 00 buckshot.

First Look: Anderson A4 Series with Picatinny Rails

Classically styled rifles, carbines and large-format pistols from one of America's most-popular AR builders.

Fightin' Iron: Those German Semi-Automatic Pistols

There are gun collectors who admire the craftsmanship and ingenuity of arms from other countries.

Are Double Stack 1911s Making A Comeback?

All that is old is new again, as the double- stack 1911 becomes the new hotness.

Wiley X Quietly Celebrating 35 Years In Business

What started out in a basement is now a global enterprise.

First Look: Hornady Subsonic 7.6x39mm Ammo

All the thump of 7.62x39mm, without all the noise.

Interests



Get the best of Shooting Illustrated delivered to your inbox.