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I Carry: Mossberg MC1sc in a CrossBreed Freedom Carry Holster

Welcome to another episode of "I Carry," Shooting Illustrated's weekly video series covering the guns and gear needed to put together a potential everyday-carry kit. Today, we're using the Mossberg MC1sc carried inside a CrossBreed holster. We also have a Kershaw EDC knife, a CrossBreed magazine carrier and a Pelican flashlight.

Mossberg MC1sc (MSRP: $421)

Mossberg’s MC1sc pistol, released at SHOT Show earlier this year, gave the company its first concealed-carry option since the 1920s. Rather than a four-shot pepperbox (which, granted, would have been cool), Mossberg opted to have the MC1 follow a pretty familiar route: a Striker-fired, polymer-frame subcompact 9 mm. It’s a combination that’s meant success for both concealed-carry permit holders and the firearm companies that make such pistols. The Smith & Wesson Shield, Glock G43, Springfield Armory XD-S and others dominate the market for a concealable 9 mm handgun.

We’ve covered the MC1 previously here on “I Carry,” so rather than go over specs again, let’s focus on something that came up in my initial review as a positive for this new pistol: the trigger. With a flat-face that breaks at a ninety degree angle and a crisp reset, the MC1’s trigger really is something of which to take note. The MC1 is surprisingly easy to shoot, which is a feat for guns of this size given the reduced real estate for strong-hand grip and support hand placement.

Size-wise, the MC1 is quite similar to the Glock G43 and Springfield XD-S, and only marginally larger than the Smith & Wesson Shield. It’s still a little large for pocket carry outside of larger cargo pants, but fits inside the waistband like a dream. If you’re a fan of appendix carry, the MC1 fills that role well, and there’s even a version with a thumb safety if you are so inclined. Easy to shoot well, easy to carry and at a reasonable price? There’s a lot to like about the Mossberg MC1.

CrossBreed Freedom Carry Holster (MSRP: $64.50, $84.50 Founders leather)

One of the downsides of a new-to-market firearm, though, is that one often plays catch-up with gear choices. More and more options are available every day for the MC1, and CrossBreed has risen to the challenge with its Freedom Carry Holster. Offering a fitted kydex shell bolted to a leather backing, this hybrid offers friction retention balanced with comfort, and can be carried either standard inside the waistband or appendix-style as shown thanks to its adjustable cant. The Freedom Carry is available in a variety of leather and kydex finishes, such as the “Founder’s” model we have for the MC1.

CrossBreed Tuckable IWB Magazine carrier (MSRP: $45.50; $60.95 Founders leather)

Finding a magazine carrier that fits the unique, clear-polymer magazines for the MC1 is not as easy as you might think—it’s thicker than a single-stack—so a dedicated carrier like CrossBreed’s Tuckable IWB is a must. Available in double-magazine or the single variant shown, the Tuckable IWB offers the same kydex shell bolted to a leather backing as the Freedom Carry holster. A spring-steel clip holds the Tuckable IWB fast, with two different ride-height options available.

Kershaw Misdirect (MSRP: $38.49)

For our pocketknife, we’ve gone with the Kershaw’s Misdirect, which features a 2.9-inch, 4Cr13-steel reverse-tanto blade with Kershaw’s proprietary BlackWash finish. It opens with a SpeedSafe assisted-opening flipper and is kept locked in place with a frame lock. Stainless steel, stonewash scales keep weight to a super light 3.2 ounces, while a lanyard hole is offered in addition to a reversible pocket
clip. Best of all? This attractive, easy-to-open knife is available for less than $40.

Pelican 7100 (MSRP: $83.95)

Our last item for today’s carry gear is a Pelican 7100 rechargeable LED flashlight. More and more companies are including rechargeable options to their flashlight lines, which is simply brilliant given the ubiquity of the USB charging cable in our modern world. There’s a lot to be said for the ability to charge your light at your desk, in your car or just sitting on your kitchen counter.

The 7100 has three brightness levels, plus strobe: 695 lumens and one hour and fifteen minutes of run time on high, 348 lumens for an hour and a half on medium and 33 lumens for nine hours and fifteen minutes on low. Five different pre-programmed run modes can be cycled that allow different power levels at power up.

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