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2011: Will it be Wisconsin's Year?

2011: Will it be Wisconsin's Year?

Now that some time has passed since the 2010 mid-term elections, political pundits, firearm owners and shooting enthusiasts are generally viewing the Nov. 2 results as decidedly positive for the furthering of pro-firearms legislation and protection of Second Amendment rights.

With most of the national attention focused on critical races for U.S. Congress, candidates endorsed by the NRA Political Victory Fund were victorious in 85 percent of U.S. House races, and 19 of 25 U.S. Senate races.

To put these results in perspective, in the 111th Congress, there were 43 NRA A-rated Senators and 34 F-rated Senators. The 112th Congress will contain 50 A-rated (+7) and 33 F-rated Senators (-1). On the House side, there were 226 NRA A-rated and 151 F-rated Representatives in the 111th Congress. The 112th Congress will contain 258 A-rated (+32) and 133 F-rated (-18) members. 

In state elections, pro-gun governors were elected overwhelmingly, but perhaps no state election result was more closely watched by gun-owners than that of Wisconsin.

The election of a Republican governor and new GOP majorities in both the House and Senate have enhanced the prospect for liberalized handgun carry legislation in Wisconsin. That's because the Badger State remains as one of only two states (along with Illinois) that deny any citizen the right to carry concealed firearms for personal protection.

Throughout his campaign, governor-elect Scott Walker vowed to support concealed-carry and "castle-doctrine" legislation. His predecessor, two-term Democratic Gov. Jim Doyle, twice vetoed concealed-handgun licensing measures.

Even when the Wisconsin legislature was under Democratic control, it came within a single vote of overriding Doyle's veto.

When the 2011 legislative session convenes in Madison this January, many believe Wisconsin will be on its way to becoming the 49th state to approve legislation allowing the concealed carry of firearms for personal protection by law-abiding citizens.

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