The Aftermath

by
posted on September 13, 2012
wilson2015_fs.jpg (56)

When thinking about defending ourselves against a violent criminal attack, we give a good deal of thought to the kind of handgun we will carry, the latest, most effective defensive ammunition and proper concealment techniques. Some folks even go so far as to get professional training and study defensive tactics. But most people overlook what they will do in the aftermath of a defensive shooting. In short, they have a good plan that simply doesn't go far enough.

In the aftermath of a defensive shooting, you can expect to be quite emotional. You will probably be upset and just a little bit confused. You will be trying to remember what happened and trying to think about what you should do next. Your mind will be in turmoil, even though you don't recognize it. Obviously, this is not the best time to be talking to the police, even though that is exactly what you're going to have to do. Simply put, at this point, you need a lawyer.

But, you don't need just any old lawyer. Your brother-in-law who practices real-estate law may be extremely sympathetic, but he is not trained to deal with the legal issues you face. The situation calls for the advice and guidance of a lawyer who practices criminal-defense law. This is the guy or gal who will know what you should and shouldn't say to police, the person who will help you formulate any statement in the clearest and most honest manner.

Ideally, one should obtain the counsel of a good criminal-defense attorney before he ever has to use his handgun in self-defense. Don't expect to get good legal advice for free—you are going to have to pay the attorney for his time and counsel. That should be part of your defensive budget.

Now, I know attorneys don't come cheap. Therefore, the smart move is to form a group of like-minded friends and hire a lawyer to come talk to you. Get together and have a gun-friendly defense attorney come speak to your gun club, or make it a program for your neighborhood-watch group. But get some good legal advice.

Too many people get their legal advice from the Internet commandos and gun-store experts. Friends, this is a recipe for disaster. We are fortunate to have numerous attorneys who support the Second Amendment and the citizen's right to personal defense. They are an important part of our family and can help a person through the aftermath of a defensive shooting.

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