Mission First Tactical Bipod Mount BP1

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posted on May 18, 2016
mft-bipod-mount.jpg

Steadying a rifle in the field can be accomplished in many ways: packs, slings and elements in your environment can all be used to hold a rifle immobile for a precision shot. However, whether seated at a bench or stretched out prone, using a bipod to anchor your rifle often allows for the greatest level of precision and stability.

How, then, to attach the bipod to your rifle? Most traditional bolt-action rifles have a swivel sling stud to which one can be attached. It's a simple (albeit a little frustrating as you attempt to get the bipod's attachment arms properly positioned) process that results in a solid attachment of the bipod to the rifle's fore-end. But what about AR-15-style rifles that don't have traditional sling swivels?

In those cases, there are two ways to go about attaching a bipod. Either use a bipod that attaches directly to a Picatinny-style rail, or attach an intermediate device to your rifle's 6'-o'clock rail to attach a standard bipod. The latter is exactly what the Mission First Tactical BP1 Bipod Mount was designed to do.

It literally could not be simpler to get this device on your rifle: Depress the quick-detach button to slide the mount on your rifle's rail, then attach the bipod as you would to any other sling swivel. Period. Full stop. Weighing less than 2 ounces and taking up 2 1/2 inches of rail space, it doesn't add significant bulk or reduce available rail space appreciably.

MSRP: $24.99. Available in black, foliage green, gray and scorched dark earth.

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