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The October Issue of Shooting Illustrated is on Newsstands Now!

The October Issue of Shooting Illustrated is on Newsstands Now!

The October issue of Shooting Illustrated, on newsstands now, reveals the new Mossberg MVP LC, a modular chassis system for the company’s proven MVP bolt-action platform. This exciting new take on the company’s rock-solid line of affordable rifles allows detachable magazines, M-LOK-compatible accessories, interchangeable pistol grips and adjustable stocks to enhance the shooting experience. 

And while we’re on the subject of making a shooting experience better, Field Editor Bryce M. Towsley gives a new look to an old rifle. Fresh from last month’s issue, where he reviewed a Mosin-Nagant M91/30 Sniper rifle, Towsley has undertaken the task of updating another 91/30 to be more of a modern bolt-action rifle. The addition of a polymer stock and other updates and upgrades bring this 125-year-old rifle into the 21st century. 

While we’re on the subject of old firearms with a new twist, we investigate the .22 TCM cartridge from Armscor. This necked-down .223 Rem. offers centerfire, sub-quarter-caliber performance in a round that fits in a standard 9 mm chamber, allowing the M22 bolt-action rifle to share magazines with the TCM TAC Ultra FS 1911-based pistol. Not only does the pistol fire the new .22 TCM, but a spare barrel allows it to shoot more conventional 9 mm fodder, making it a solid option for target-shooting or self-defense. 

A self-defense skill many work on improving is the reload, and we present Chris Christian’s method for performing this administrative task. Generally, reloads have fallen into one of two categories: reloading from empty, where the depleted magazine is dropped clear of the firearm and a fresh magazine inserted, or a partial/tactical reload, where a full magazine replaces a partly empty one. In this case, the change has to do with how magazines are manipulated rather than when they are removed. Read this new take on replacing spent magazines and see if you agree. 

Most of us will certainly agree that the brand new Trijicon MRO red-dot optic brings an exciting new option to the world of tiny red-dot sights. This hardy, Mil-Spec sight offers the durability and ruggedness inherent to the Trijicon name at a price that won’t dwarf that of the rifle to which it is attached. Read how this new optic fared in our vigorous testing. 

Look for these articles and much more in the October issue of Shooting Illustrated, The Definitive Source for the Modern Shooter, at a newsstand near you. You can also subscribe by calling (877) 223-3840. 

For more information: visit ShootingIllustrated.com, call Editor-in-Chief Ed Friedman at (703) 267-1331 or e-mail efriedman@nrahq.org.

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