The Not So Silent Affair

by
posted on July 16, 2009
sinews.jpg (15)

Friend and fellow U.N.C.L.E. fan John Rhoda recently asked me whether I'd given any thought to the possibility of registering the dummy suppressor Joe made in order to have it converted into an actual functioning one.

I told him I considered it a waste of time and money due to its impractical dimensions.Being close to the same size and diameter of a roll of quarters, a functional duplicate of the U.N.C.L.E. suppressor wouldn't be very efficient at dampening sound because of the limited space for sound-dampening material, such as baffles, grease or even water.

Oh well, it may not be functional, or even practical—but it sure looks cool.

For those brave enough to delve deeper into the mind of Bob Boyd, visit Boyd's Blog fan page on Facebook, or subscribe to its Twitter feed.

Latest

Mossberg 500 and 590 shotguns
Mossberg 500 and 590 shotguns

Mossberg 500 and 590: America’s Defensive Shotguns

Since 1961, the O.F. (Oscar Frederick) Mossberg company has sold more than 11 million of its Model 500 pump-action shotguns, making it the most popular shotgun of all time, if not one of the most sold guns in any category, period.

Customizing the Colt Detective Special

Got a gun with that has seen better days? Perhaps Grandpa’s favorite gun was obviously “well loved?” Talented gunsmiths and other artisans are out there who can give your favorite firearm a much-needed face-lift.

First Look: Dead Air Armament Primal Suppressor

Dead Air Armament is adding the Primal, a new.46-caliber magnum rated suppressor to their lineup of firearms sound suppressors.

9/11 20 Years Later: A Special Smith & Wesson

There are still heroes in this world. We mourn the loss of one some 20 years later on the 20th anniversary of the September 11th attacks.

Why Defensive Firearms Training is So Important

Yes, you may never have to fire your handgun in defense of your life or family, but the possibility always exists.

Review: Smith & Wesson Shield Plus

In retrospect, Smith & Wesson had nobody to blame for the situation but themselves. The company didn’t invent the subcompact, lightweight, single-stack nine, of course. Walther and Beretta had preceded the original Shield to market by a few years with the PPS and the Nano, respectively, and Kahr had more or less created the niche back in the 1990s.

Interests



Get the best of Shooting Illustrated delivered to your inbox.