Attorney General Inquiries Lead to Lifting of Firearms Restrictions in Alabama

by
posted on July 30, 2015
si-news-2015-5-28-15.jpg (13)

An Alabama city, state agency and a county sheriff have reversed restrictions imposed on firearms following inquiries conducted by Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange.

On July 29, Strange released public statements about complaints he had received concerning unlawful prohibitions of firearms.

Strange said complaints he received and a subsequent inquiry from his office prompted the Department of Transportation to announce last week the reversal of its prohibition of firearms at public highway rest areas in violation of state law. In addition, the city of Moulton removed signs prohibiting firearms at Moulton Recreation Center and at H.A. Alexander Park after being advised by the attorney general that the prohibition violated state law.

Further, the AG’s office reviewed a complaint that the Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office’s pistol permits included “extra” conditions on the back of the permit itself. As a result of the investigation, the Sheriff agreed to omit the conditions and include only this language: “License to carry a Revolver or a Pistol Concealed on the person or in a vehicle is hereby granted, except where State law prohibits.”

In response to the Alabama AG’s inquiries and actions, The National Rifle Association-Institute for Legislative Action (NRA-ILA) issued a press release commending Strange for his investigation and “for upholding the Second Amendment rights of Alabamans.”

“Our constitutionally protected right to defend ourselves is under constant threat, in many cases by anti-gun bureaucrats or politicians who have overstepped their authority,” said Chris W. Cox, executive director of the NRA-ILA. “Luther (Strange) is putting all state bureaucrats and localities on notice that Alabama will not tolerate any violation of our right to Keep and Bear Arms.”

Latest

handguns
handguns

Are Percussion Revolvers and Single-Shot Muzzleloaders Obsolete?

It’s known that firearms can serve for a long time after they’re no longer cutting edge. Flintlocks held on long into the percussion era. During the American Civil War, plenty of cavalry units, especially local militias, turned up with single-shot pistols despite Colt’s revolvers having been on the market for a while by then.

German Police Department Converts to Blackhawk Holsters

Blackhawk’s German distributor, Helmut Hofmann, has been awarded a contract from the Niedersachsen Police Department in Germany for new duty holsters from Blackhawk’s T-Series Holster line.

First Look: CZ P-10 F Competition-Ready Pistol

The new P-10 F Competition-Ready has a barrel and slide that are a half-inch longer than the full-size model, which provides a longer sight radius. 

Review: Colt Anaconda Revolver

We cannot lie: Colt’s latest revolver oozes class—and power. The new Anaconda is impressive and tough.

I Carry: Taurus G3 TORO Pistol in a Kinetic Concealment Holster

In today's episode of "I Carry," we have a Taurus G3 TORO optics-ready pistol equipped with a Bushnell RXS-100 red-dot sight and carried in a Kinetic Concealment outside-the-waistband holster.

Solving Issues with Brass Casings

Recently, while shooting a Norinco SKS, I experienced a failure to go into battery. Upon removing the cartridge, I found the round to be “shrouded” by another brass casing.

Interests



Get the best of Shooting Illustrated delivered to your inbox.