Thunderstick summit

After-Action Report: The Thunderstick Summit

A historic gathering of some of the top defensive-shotgun instructors created a unique training opportunity.

Skills Check: Present Arms

We refer to the draw stroke as the presentation at Gunsite. It’s a better explanation than simply “drawing” the pistol, because it describes the act of presenting the pistol from the holster to the target or threat. In our “basic,” five-day pistol class we expect students to present the pistol and make hits on targets from 3 to 7 yards away in 1.5 seconds. Most students can do this in two or three days of training.

Mental Focus vs. Mental Awareness

Shooting at the very edge of your skills envelope requires tremendous mental focus and well-developed shooting awareness. However, some shooters believe that shooting awareness and mental focus are one in the same. They are not. Using pistol shooting (combat or competition) as an example, what is the difference between the two and how can it help you hone your shooting skills to a razor’s edge?

Long Range Shooting For Beginners

Shooting long range has been described as “weaponized math,” and for good reason…

First Look: Blackhound Emerge Series Riflescopes

Four new riflescopes that are ideal for longer distances.

Task Performance Under Stress

There is no such thing as multi-tasking. Only one task at a time, done as quickly as possible.

The Sight Alignment Dilemma

Aligning your sights and your gun to the target seems easy. Mastering this skill, however, is hard work.

Skills Check: How To Shoot Faster

Shooters like shooting tight, small groups. Small groups are indicative of the ability to apply marksmanship skills consistently. And besides, they’re good for bragging rights and one-upmanship. 

Shoot United Event Draws Capacity Crowd

Winchester Ammunition gave dozens of people a chance to fire their first shots.

Fightin' Iron: Good, Better, Best

Moviegoers of 1950 enjoyed a motion picture with a unique plot twist. Rather than a tale of the trials and tribulations of a hero, we were treated to the travels and transfers of a gun. A big-budget Western starring Jimmy Stewart leading a large cast of well-known actors, “Winchester ’73” treated the gun as though it were a character. Its behavior (accuracy) established in the opening scene, succeeding scenes showed the gun used and misused, bought and sold, as it moved from owner to owner. An interesting story and well told, the film was fictional—the gun was not. 

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