Lew Walt in uniform

Fightin' Iron: Lew Walt

Helicopters make a distinctive sound. It’s sort of a whop-whop noise, and it differs a little from one chopper model to the next. The Vietnam War was the first true helicopter war. Early on, our primary troop carrier was the CH-34. We also had an observation outfit flying the UH-1Es (a variant of the legendary “Huey”).

Fightin' Iron: The Smith & Wesson Model 39 Handgun

When he made the point, my buddy was speaking from a position of strength. Chuck Karwan—West Point graduate, champion heavyweight wrestler, combat platoon leader, Green Beret, outdoorsman, gunwriter—was a bear of a guy. He had an encyclopedic knowledge of firearms of all sorts. Karwan was particularly fond of digging into the development of handguns; sights, systems, breeching, etc.; from Paterson to present.

Why the Purpose of a Fight is to Win

In a fight, there is no substitute for victory.

The Physics of Machine-Gun Fire

There’s a science to the employ of full-automatic weaponry in wartime.

Fightin' Iron: The Smith & Wesson Triple Lock

Finely crafted and machined for enhanced reliability, many enthusiasts consider the Smith & Wesson Triple Lock the finest revolver ever made.

Fightin’ Iron: STEN Mk V

Although it may resemble an ungainly plumber’s contraption, the STEN gun was designed to fill an urgent military need.

Fightin' Iron: The Model 1917 Revolver

Colt and Smith & Wesson’s 1917 wasn’t a byproduct of a designer’s drawing board, but of necessity.

Fightin' Iron: How the H-34 Helicopter Changed the Face of Combat

Perhaps the single greatest tool in the Marine Corps has a blade—a rotor blade.

Fightin' Iron: The Book... And When To Throw It Away

Occasionally, rules can be overlooked when lives are at stake, like when USMC Lt. Chuck Pitman flew to the rescue in New Orleans.

Fightin' Iron: A Place to Shoot

Everyone needs a place to practice their craft, and shooters are no exception.

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