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Extraordinary Bullets

Big-game hunters demand a lot from a bullet. Not only must the value-priced projectile punch cloverleaf patterns beyond 100 yards with the utmost regularity, it must also withstand violent, close-range impacts at velocities in excess of Mach 3, while expanding reliably at distances where half this speed is a godsend.

.30-06 Turns 100

Though it's more than 100 years old, the .30-06 Sprg. remains one of the most popular rounds in the United States.

Springfield SOCOM 16

Springfield Armory sought out to further improve upon the idea within its own well-established M1A product, and the SOCOM 16 was born. The most obvious change came with the shortened 16-inch barrel, giving the SOCOM a decidedly tactical look and feel.

The Name Game

You gotta admit, .357 Magnum has a ring to it. How could a cartridge with that name be anything less than magnificent?

Olympic Arms K8 Magnum Targetmatch

The AR-15 and the .223 Rem. cartridge are as indelibly linked as bread and butter. But like butter in this cholesterol-phobic world, the cartridge has its critics, including me. (Photos by Bryce M. Towsley)

125-Grain MatchKing

New .30-Caliber (.308 diameter) bullets from one of the most trusted names in the field.

7.62×40 WT

Wilson Combat's new cartridge is an innovative way to turn a standard AR-15 upper receiver into a .30-caliber thumper.

Thor Ronningen's '03 Springfield

99th Infantry Division

The Bulge

On the 67th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, Shooting Illustrated takes a look at the men and American-designed guns that beat Hitler's wintertime gamble in the Ardennes.

Max L. Noe's .30-caliber machine gun

Applesauce 28th Infantry Division style

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