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Take it Slow and Easy

Take it Slow and Easy

Fortunately, we don't have many shooting "accidents," and fewer still that result in injury. However, there is one form of negligent discharge that occurs among defensive shooters and often does lead to injury. And it is the result of re-holstering too fast.

For some reason, there are those defensive shooters who, after firing their shots, go back to their holster in a quick, snappy fashion. I don't know—maybe they think it looks cool. The problem occurs when their hand is moving faster than their brain, and they don't get their trigger finger out of the trigger guard in time. When this happens, it is generally followed by a loud noise, and some bleeding often occurs. To begin with, one should not try to draw, shoot or otherwise handle his pistol any faster than his ability will allow.

When the gun comes off the target, the manual safety, if there is one, should be engaged and the trigger finger placed along the frame, above the trigger guard. With striker-fired pistol, it is even more important for the trigger finger to be out of the trigger guard. These precautions are not designed just so a range officer will have something to yell about—they are meant to avoid a dangerous negligent discharge.

In a gunfight, one only re-holsters after the attacker is down and no longer a threat. One should then assess his immediate surroundings, searching for any remaining threats. We re-holster only when we are satisfied the world is once again a peaceful and lovely place. Therefore, there is every reason to re-holster slowly and carefully.

Slow, careful re-holstering has to be a learned process and must be practiced over and over again. It should be a regular part of every defensive shooter's practice sessions. Keep your trigger finger straight and re-holster slowly. Make it a regular part of your practice sessions and you will need a lot fewer band aids.

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