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Wisconsin Extends CCW Reciprocity to 25 States

Wisconsin Extends CCW Reciprocity to 25 States

On October 20, the Wisconsin Department of Justice released the list of states that will be recognized under the concealed carry statute, based on background checks that are comparable to those required under current Wisconsin law. Licensees from any of the listed states will be recognized in Wisconsin as an out-of-state licensee per Sec. 175.60 (1)(g) Wis. Stats, according to the DOJ.

"If another state's background check meets the same requirements a Wisconsin resident must meet, the DOJ has recognized that state," reads the department's concealed carry information website. "The DOJ has tried to be as inclusive as possible and will periodically check and update the list if other states can be added."

The reciprocity states include: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

The constitutional-carry states of Arizona and Wyoming made the reciprocity list even though their residents are allowed to carry firearms without a permit. However, each state continues to offer a CCW-permit system that may be used for reciprocity with other states.

Also last week, the Wisconsin DOJ announced it has prepared a model 4-hour CCW-permit curriculum available for use by law enforcement agencies and instructors certified by a national or state organization. It stressed the curriculum is recommended, but not required, and instructors may use the national or state organization's curriculum or develop their own.

The DOJ model curriculum is ready-for-use, including a student text, instructor guide, additional instructor resources and a sample training certificate.

Wisconsin's concealed-carry statute becomes law as a measure to extend reciprocity nationwide is being considered in the U.S. Congress, which could allow gun owners with valid state permits to carry firearms in 49 states. With 245 co-sponsors in the U.S. House, HB 822, the National Right-to-Carry Reciprocity Act of 2011, continues to move forward.

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